Sunday, January 11, 2015

Eat rabbits?

Yenidə sualım var...

This is the second time that someone has said to me - Ay səni dovşan yesin!

OK - so this is definitely not advice to eat a rabbit!

This was a helpful comment:

If it is an idiom, then it is likely to express "mildly", with humor, approval or admiration towards the other party because of its some words, deeds and the like; and word by word translation doesn't mean advice to eat rabbits but a wish to be eaten by a rabbit.

Anyway, apart from the grammar of the thing, it is obviously an idiom. It was a popular song in 2014.

I get the "good" message of this idiom, but how to express it in English? Literally would it be "May a rabbit eat you!" That is, I think, you are so good, kind, etc. that a little rabbit would love to eat you?

Also other colleagues have said that the compliment is that a rabbit eats slowly - he will enjoy eating you for such a long time!

In English I think that the closest idiom we have is: "I could just eat you up!" It's the sort of thing you say to small kids because they are so sweet.

Am I getting closer?

I did some more research - OK, I just asked my taxi driver. He said that the response to this would be:

"Saxlasın axşam yesin! Əgər vaxtı olmasa, bişirsin indi yesin!"

"Let him keep you until the evening to have you have you for his supper! But if he doesn't have time, let him cook you now and eat you." 


1 comment:

Tofik Dadashev said...

If it is an idiom, then it is likely to express "mildly", with humor, approval or admiration towards the other party because of its some words, deeds and the like; and word by word translation doesn't mean advice to eat rabbits but a wish to be eaten by a rabbit